Summer Solstice Cloth and Strawberries

26 May

The solstice cloth is finished. And I just deleted a long comment. A comment explaining that I don’t TRY to create cloth that has an indigenous–perhaps Native American look to it. In fact, often I try NOT to–and I’m stressing the “try not to” here. Because often it seems to happen on its own.
The center of this cloth was asking for the lines around the sun. I wanted to do something else–something whimsical maybe, but something that wouldn’t look like this. But the cloth wasn’t having it. Everything–every other thing–was contrived. So here it is. The cloth stayed true to itself and kept me honest as well.

solstice

And we’ve had a few glorious days of NM blue sky with breeze. Breeze. Another word that sounds like itself. The evenings have been really cool and so my morning slug-fest hasn’t been yielding many critters. This is good. I think the indigo and beans will be o.k. if they can get a little growth on them during the next five or six days. And the strawberries are just coming on like crazy
strawberries

16 Responses to “Summer Solstice Cloth and Strawberries”

  1. karmadondruplhamo, (grace) May 26, 2013 at 12:23 am #

    OHHHHHHHHHH…the cloth is magnificent. and i understand about the sensitivity to
    appropriating cultural symbols…but the cloth is the cloth and it wants what it wants.
    it’s just like it IS!!!!

    and your STRAINER IS THE COLOR I WANTED MY PAINT TO BE!!!!

    strawberries…a woman i know here does grow some…has a really good drip system…
    i envy you those berries. there is nothing like them…well, maybe corn….
    love,

  2. Patricia May 26, 2013 at 12:38 am #

    hi, you! the strainer is actually kinda very light minty green–that old green –not quite celadon but still such a, i hate to say it, vintage color. but our bedroom was painted color before we got here and i’m about to go crazy finding the time to paint it out of existence.

    you expressed my concern so perfectly–“sensitivity to appropriating cultural symbols”–thank you and i’m grateful to have it summed up this way. perhaps it will make expressing that concern easier the next time.

    and i agree–with your observation about corn–and would add–corn eaten IN the garden, still full of sunshine. love, love

    • karmadondruplhamo, (grace) May 26, 2013 at 2:13 am #

      the Zia. a form i relate to so extremely strongly. yes. and well, it’s
      even on our New Mexico state flag…which i think is a good indicator
      of HOW strong this very simple image IS. it is
      SUN
      in all its glory
      and i love how you say” the cloth stayed true to itself and kept me honest
      as well.”
      i think that’s all it takes…acknowledging…and just going.

      • Patricia May 26, 2013 at 11:41 am #

        i just googled zia sun symbol

        http://jessicawhitten.com/meaning-of-zia-symbol.html

        and i’m noticing the similarities and differences. BUT what’s really impacting me is reading about the “meaning” of the symbol and the number 4 to the people of the Zia pueblo–and noticing how i’m resonating with
        it. yes. YES. i’m dancing out loud! the four seasons of the year, the points on the compass, the four stages of life–the four sacred aspects of development.

        this is feeling so absolutely affirming for me–this, and your comments about acknowledging and just going. and i’m marvelling at the power of this for me. what a gift–these comments and insights.

  3. birdingbesty May 26, 2013 at 1:33 am #

    The cloth is wonderful and says summer solstice to my spirit as I sit and look at it full-screen. The cloth spoke and you listened and the finished piece is just as it is…perfect.
    The vintage strainer calls to me…need to find one this season. Alpine strawberry bushed are filled now with blooms and the bees are happy…the other strawberries just put on some white show today…about ten days to two weeks they will be delicious with the rhubarb that I have been harvesting and putting up now for two weeks. With good water and some seaweed fertilizer it is one huge and very happy plant.
    Thanks for sharing the harvest in your locale…makes my mouth water.
    Namaste…

    • Mo Crow May 26, 2013 at 6:20 am #

      well gosh this Summer Solstice Cloth is just so you Patricia & it’s good to be careful with your symbols! To know they are yours and come straight from the heart… for so many years of living in Australia (but born in Oklahoma) whenever I came across a reference to a Native North American Medicine Wheel I would try to invert all the directions to suit the Southern Hemisphere ie the South for the place of warmth and innocence became the cold place of high intellect & maturity but it never quite felt right ’til i finally grocked that my body is a medicine wheel… where my feet touch the Earth is South, where my head touches the Sky is North, the sun rises is in the East and sets in the West no matter where I stand and my creative centre is still 2 inches below my navel even without a womb… so I don’t tie myself in knots about all that anymore. Y’know humans have been appropriating symbols from each other & out of the past for thousands of years. When I researched the magical Voodoo like symbols that were erected as lightning rods on the old Victorian terraces here in Sydney I discovered that they weren’t built with magical intent but were an eclectic fashion statement of the 1880’s & those symbols were derived from the old alchemists who appropriated them from the Greeks who got them from Egypt and so it goes… but talking of Egypt, did you know that Hollywood invented the Curse of the Mummy back in the 30’s!?! & talking of appropriation I can’t wait to see Johnny Depp play a shamanic Tonto in The Lone Ranger!

      • Patricia May 26, 2013 at 11:56 am #

        you’ve given me SO much to think about here. i especially love the image of our bodies being medicine wheels in themselves.
        (and that you used “grocked” and it’s been so long since i’ve heard that!) so yes. our heads are north, feet south–our front side, east–and west to the rear. this notion of spatial orientation feels so informative and feels like it will positively impact the way in which i move myself through time and space. and of course, now that you point it out, “humans have been appropriating symbols” for ever. but as i write that, i’m thinking this:
        forever humans have shared a universality of experience and insight, and our efforts to convey that in a “graphic”/visual way often appear similar–the 100 monkeys idea, i suppose. whatever, all i know is that for me, this morning, there is tremendous affirmation and validation from the insights i’m receiving from all of these comments. so i thank you, dear Mo, for taking the time to visit, to comment, and to help. much love.

    • Patricia May 26, 2013 at 11:45 am #

      birdingbetsy! welcome here. i thank you for your comments and for taking the time to look full screen at the solstice cloth. and when i read your comment, for the first time i realized that rhubarb and strawberries DO mature pretty much at the same time–so no wonder strawberries and rhubarb often appear together in pies. i have no idea why this awareness is making me so happy, but thanks for providing the insight.

    • Patricia May 26, 2013 at 11:57 am #

      somehow my comment to you got out of order–it’s below here, a few down.

  4. saskia May 26, 2013 at 7:33 am #

    all the women above have commented so wisely on the cultural appropriation……thingy I could not attempt anything close and I concur wholeheartedly;
    so what remains to be said is what a stunning piece this has turned out to be, true to itself and kept you an honest woman all in one go! ha that is quite an achievement for a cloth.

    • Patricia May 26, 2013 at 12:00 pm #

      indeed–another instance of the power of cloth. and it continues to amaze me. now that you’re here, i want you to know that i’m still diligently trying to subscribe to your blog, and every time i think “yes, now i’ve succeeded” i come back later to see new posts and realize i didn’t get a notice. in a way, it has become somewhat of a challenging game for me. gives me an opportunity to appreciate my innate tenacity! ha.

      • saskia May 26, 2013 at 12:46 pm #

        I have no idea how to solve this…..these ‘connecting tools’ are truly beyond me; I wonder if it might have something to do with me having blogger and you wordpress, I have difficulties commenting over at Grace and Jude both typepad-users, although I don’t over here…..it’s a riddle and we must remain determined throughout;-)

        • Patricia May 26, 2013 at 12:49 pm #

          yes, as the I Ching states so eloquently, “perseverance furthers.”

  5. Kathleen May 26, 2013 at 1:36 pm #

    Patricia, the solstice cloth is magnificent. Absolutely beautiful.

  6. constanza September 7, 2013 at 10:38 pm #

    oh that solstice flag is just too beautiful. it is so wonderful to get inspiration from like-minded artists. this will certainly bring me back to playing with fabrics again. thank you.

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